REVIEW OF LAURA MATULA IN 'THE RAY LEGACY' (Studio Tenn, Jamison Theater)

Standout performers are Laura Matula — with her soulful renditions of “Unchain My Heart” and “You Don’t Know Me,” plus a humorous, scat-inflected “Makin’ Whoopee” — and John-Mark McGaha, a worship music educator by trade who adds some beautiful acoustic guitar playing and savory blues and gospel piano licks to his excellent vocals.
— NASHVILLE SCENE, April 2016
Meanwhile, Laura Matula tells a story with every song, from “Unchain My Heart” to the tender “You Don’t Know Me.” And together with McGaha, she offers a worthy nod to Charles’ distinctive country sound with “Cryin’ Time.”
— THE TENNESSEAN, April 2016

REVIEW OF LAURA MATULA IN 'THE WIZARD OF OZ' (Studio Tenn, Schermerhorn Symphony Center)

The Wicked Witch is frightening and overbearing, yet somehow tremendously appealing in a bad girl sort of way that’s left men slack-jawed for a hundred years or more. Logan’s casting of American Idol and Broadway veteran Diana DeGarmo as Dorothy, and local theatrical forces of nature Megan Murphy Chambers and Laura Matula (as Glinda and The Wicked Witch of the West, respectively) as the triumvirate lends further gravitas to the theory that the show’s really about that trio of strong-willed women, with the rest of the characters serving to support their aims...Matula’s Wicked Witch is unique and intriguing as she commands the stage with skill and navigates her way in Logan’s fishtailed gown that accents her movement s with stylish flair. She’s fully engaged and completely sensusal in her performance and she virtually stops the show with her jazzy rendition of “The Jitterbug Waltz” that is wonderfully danced by the show’s ensemble to Emily Tello Speck’s superb choreography.
— BROADWAYWORLD.COM, June 2015
Laura Matula is just as good as the Wicked Witch of the West, offering a cackle that could curl your hair. Her jazzy take on “The Jitterbug” provides another highlight — particularly when accompanied by the excellent ensemble and Emily Tello Speck’s fabulous choreography.
— THE TENNESSEAN, June 2015
They are all perfectly cast and absolutely engaging with far too many highlights to include here, though ...I will note that Matula’s cackle, Waller’s Marlon Brando impersonation and Parker’s bicycling ability are just a few of the extra cherries on top of a very tasty Studio Tenn sundae...
— NASHVILLEARTSCRITIC.COM, June 2015
This Oz featured enchanting performances from principal players but also wonderful ensemble work, from the corps of animated dancers under the helm of choreographer Emily Tello Speck to the 42 child-Munchkins who captivated a thoroughly rapt audience with their precocious precision...Laura Matula’s goblin-green Wicked Witch sang big and led a mesmerizing, all-hands-on-deck rendition of the infamous “Jitterbug” number.
— NASHVILLE SCENE, June 2015

REVIEW OF LAURA MATULA IN 'THE CASH LEGACY' (Studio Tenn, Jamison Hall)

Studio Tenn favorite Laura Matula is simply stunning, putting her unique spin on familiar tunes such as “Cry, Cry, Cry.” And her heartbreaking rendition of “Give My Love to Rose” is an unexpected treat.
— THE TENNESSEAN, February 2015
Laura Matula broke my heart with “Give My Love to Rose”. Truth is, I might have teared up just writing about it. It was a powerful moment. She poured herself out in this song and sang it with such empathy I could see her kneeling at the railroad tracks with this dear, dying man, holding his face in her hands...
— SHELIA MULLICAN, February 2015
Make no mistake — the singers are not merely singers. For all their excellent vocals, Laura Matula, Patrick Thomas, Griffin House, Matt Haeck, Carrie Tillis and Sara Jean Kelley can, in some instances, also play the heck out of their own guitars and keyboards (and harmonica, melodica, Wurlitzer organ, autoharp and mandolin). When they and the band are rocking out together, it’s a sonorous feast of folk, country, rockabilly, blues, pop and Southern gospel.

...Matula and Kelley’s smartly upbeat take on Don Gibson’s “Oh Lonesome Me” and Matula and House on the classic “Ring of Fire.” But the show hits its stride during a momentum-gathering Act 2 passage that features, in succession, Kelley’s rendition of Kris Kristofferson’s “Sunday Morning Comin’ Down,” Matula on the super-soulful, Cash-penned “Give My Love to Rose,” Tillis and Haeck’s dirgy but epic version of Bob Dylan’s “It Ain’t Me Babe” ...
— NASHVILLE SCENE, February 2015

REVIEW OF LAURA MATULA IN 'LES MISERABLES' (Studio Tenn, Schermerhorn Symphony Center)

...There are others whose work was so good that words will never fully convey the sheer majesty of their performances. Included in the list are Laura Matula, whose electrifying “I Dreamed a Dream” as Fantine showcased her brilliance as a singer and actor...
— ARTSNASH.COM, May 2014
...I can assure audiences that this is one of the finest productions of “Les Mis” you’ll ever see. How can I be so sure? Because Logan has recruited exceptional talent from both Broadway and Nashville to bring Claude-Michel Schönburg’s epic score to life....Meanwhile, the Nashville contingent more than holds its own with vibrant performances. Laura Matula is especially lovely as Fantine...
— THE TENNESSEAN, May 2014

REVIEW OF LAURA AS ELIZA DOOLITTLE IN 'MY FAIR LADY' (Studio Tenn, Franklin Theater)

...And how does Laura Matula fare as Eliza? She’s brilliant in all aspects of her characterization. I’ve known that she was capable of such high-quality theater work since I saw her spectacular Miss Adelaide in Studio Tenn’s excellent revival of Guys and Dolls, but after hearing her rendition of “I Could Have Danced All Night” I have to make a very personal confession – may it be many years from now, but if I can just hear her angelic voice as I leave this life I will die at peace. What a phenomenal vocal instrument she has – if you haven’t heard her sing, you must. Her acting is just as marvelous; Eliza’s fantastic transformation from Cockney flower girl to well-spoken lady requires an actor with more than just a gorgeous voice, and Matula’s skills in both departments are equally impressive...
— ARTSNASH.COM, May 2013
...Frequent Studio Tenn leading lady Laura Matula returns as the fiery and stubborn Eliza, and she’s firing on all cylinders right from the top. She finds a lot of pathos in her character, deftly handles her feature numbers, including “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” one of the finest theater songs ever written. Her rendition of “I Could Have Danced All Night” is also quite stirring...
— NASHVILLE SCENE, May 2013
...Laura Matula stars as the Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle. Matula perfectly makes the transition from lowly guttersnipe to desirable princess in her role. Her beautiful singing voice paints the way from “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly” to “The Rain in Spain” and beyond. Matula delivers the evolution of her character in a fascinating way...
— NASHVILLE PARENT, May 2013

REVIEW OF LAURA IN 'SMOKEY JOE'S CAFE' (Studio Tenn, Franklin Theater)

…Laura Matula, is there anything you can’t do? Her Miss Adelaide for Studio Tenn’s Guys and Dolls was Broadway-worthy, and she’s appeared in stage and cabaret settings around Nashville for some time now displaying her amazing vocal range and acting chops. Matula always delivers, whether it’s a ballad, novelty or other type of number...
— ARTSNASH.COM, September 2012
...Doolittle is joined onstage by Laura Matula, the local musical theater and cabaret star who somehow miraculously manages to show off even more versatility than we’ve seen before, displaying an appealingly fun side to her well-known serious focus. “Don Juan” provides her with a showcase for both her vocal chops and her tremendous comedic abilities...
— BROADWAYWORLD.COM, September 2012

REVIEW OF LAURA AS MISS ADELAIDE IN 'GUYS AND DOLLS' (Studio Tenn, Franklin Theater)

...Bradshaw plays the comic possibilities of his character to the hilt; Hickman is a suave and sure Masterson; and I could listen to Tillis’ angelic vibrato forever and a day. If there’s a first among equals, though, I’d argue for Matula’s bravura performance. Her rendition of “Adelaide’s Lament” alone reaches show-stopping heights; her flexible and powerful vocals combine with consummate comedic timing to create the best performance I’ve seen of that number since I first watched Vivian Blaine (who created the role on Broadway) do it in the 1955 film version on late-night TV some years ago...
— STAGECRITIC.COM, August, 2011